Category Archives: Creative Arts

Kandinsky Circles

kadinsky

Submitted by: Heather Lockwood

Create an array of color paper rolled to mimic Kandinsky’s circles.

Goals:

  • To practice fine motor skills
  • To explore different color combinations
  • To work as a group to make a piece of cooperative art

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: cardboard box lids (e.g., shoe box or paper box lids); an array of different types of paper in different colors, sizes and patterns; black paint; paint brushes; scissors and glue.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Either before beginning the activity with the children, or as a class, paint the inside of the box lids black.

Step 2.
Cut the paper into strips of different widths and lengths.

Step 3.
Using a paint brush, coat the inside of the box lid(s) with a paint brush.

Step 4.
Have the children roll up the sheets of paper like a scroll. Place the rolled up paper standing up inside the box lid(s).

Step 5.
Fill the entire inside of the box lid(s) with rolled up paper.

Step 6.
Allow the glue to dry, then display on a wall.

Furthermore:
Wassily Kandinsky was a Russian artist who was famous for his abstract works that made use of circle shapes. Research Kandinsky in the library or online to spark discussion on abstract art. The Kandinsky Circle activity does not involve painting, but the same ideas behind it could be applied to a painting activity. Provide the children with paper and paint and encourage them to create an abstract painting using circles and/or other shapes.

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Glittery Salt

glittersalt

Create bright, three-dimensional collages or fill glass jars with layers of sparkling color! Turn flat surfaces into imaginative, tactile, sparkly works of art, with salt as your main ingredient! Add rich, vibrant color, and great texture to any collage.

Goals:

  • To observe cause and effect
  • To have fun with a sensory art activity
  • To develop fine motor skills

Before You Start:
Gather sand art bottles or recycle, small clean empty glass jars or bottles with lids from home. Set out funnels, rock salt or table salt, Liquid Watercolor™ paints, a 1/4 measuring cup, a tablespoon, BioColor® Shimmer Powder and paper towels.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Add 1 Tbsp. of Colorations® Liquid Watercolor to ¼ cup of regular table salt or rock salt, and mix.

Step 2.
Spread mixture out on a paper towel and microwave on high for 2 minutes.

Step 3.
Using fingers break up the dried pieces until the consistency is granular again.

Step 4.
Try adding baby oil or Metallic Powder for a shimmering effect. Adds rich, vibrant color, and great texture to any collage. (Does not work with gold, silver or white.)

Furthermore:
Salt teaches children about science. It’s very absorbent and reduces the freezing point of water. That’s why rock salt is sprinkled onto roads after a snowstorm: it lowers the freezing point of water and makes driving safer. It’s also used to make homemade ice cream. Think about it!

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Tape Art

tapeart

Submitted by: Alison Busby

Toddlers use tape to create amazing effects in their art.

Goals:

  • To explore cause and effect
  • To practice fine motor skills
  • To participate in a hands-on sensory activity

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: paint in multiple colors, masking or painter’s tape, cardstock or heavy painting paper, paint brushes.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Apply tape to the paper in the desired design.

Step 2.
Use fingers or painting tools to paint over the tape.

Step 3.
Carefully remove the tape from the paper.

Furthermore:
Try adding additional layers of colors. After painting with one color and removing the tape, put down more tape and paint a second color. What happens in the areas where the paint colors overlap?

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Gobble Gobble Jar of Thanks

jarthanks

Submitted by: Audrey Meidl

A great way to give thanks and to share what young ones are thankful for.

Goals:

  • To reinforce social/emotional development
  • To encourage creativity

Before You Start:
Have on hand craft foam, felt or construction paper in brown, red, yellow and orange. You will also need a papier-mâché flower pot or glass jar, scissors, tacky glue and wiggly eyes. You will also need sentence strips (or strips of cut-up lined paper) and pencils.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Using felt, foam or paper, cut out two ovals of the same size. Glue the two ovals to the outside of the flower pot or jar. This will be the turkey head. Allow the young ones to be creative with this; there is no “right” or “wrong” way.

Step 2.
Using felt, foam or paper in fall colors such as red, yellow, orange, etc., cut out more oval shapes (one of each color) and glue them to the opposite end of the flower pot or jar, on the outside.

Step 3.
Glue on wiggly eyes and use leftover felt, foam or paper to create the waddle and beak.

Step 4.
After the children are finished creating their turkey pots, have them write down things they are thankful for on the strips of paper and place them into the pot.

Step 5.
During circle time, have each child take turns sharing what they are thankful for.

Furthermore:
Tip: you can also use craft feathers instead of felt or foam for added texture. Also, add more details such as feet, or, you might want to paint the pot or jar to give it more color.

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Painting with Jackson Pollock

pollock

Submitted by: Christie Castagno

After introducing children to artist Jackson Pollock, they create their own Jackson-Pollock-style abstract painting.

Goals:

  • To learn some simple information about artist Jackson Pollock and how he painted pictures
  • To become familiar with the terms “abstract painting” and “motion painting”
  • To experience painting by moving
  • To introduce the concept that different artists have different “styles”

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: BioColor® paint in many different colors, canvas panels, paint brushes, paint cups and smocks.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Give the children a simple lesson about Jackson Pollock and how he painted. Explain the difference between abstract art and realistic art, and that there are many different ways to paint (see website under “Furthermore” for more information).

Step 2.
Provide each child with a canvas panel. Have them choose a single solid color and paint the entire panel that color. (Or, use color canvas panels) Allow to dry overnight.

Step 3.
Take the children outside and set up all painting materials in an area when they can get a little messy. Provide smocks, if possible.

Step 4.
Have the children throw, splatter and drip paint on their canvases. Their goal should be to paint without touching the paintbrush to the canvas. Paint your own canvas as an example for the children – and to get in on the fun!

Furthermore:
Visit jacksonpollock.org to experiment with making digital Jackson Pollock art. Remind children about the difference between abstract art and realistic art.

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Giant Golf Ball Painting

golfball

Submitted by: Jamie Toriello

Go BIG and take marble painting to a new level!

Goals:

  • To introduce and practice teamwork skills
  • To practice coordination

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: a plastic kiddie pool, used/old golf balls (check local golf shops) and a variety of paper and BioColor® paint colors.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Place sheets of paper at the bottom of the pool, somewhat in the center.

Step 2.
Squirt multiple colors of BioColor® paint around the edges of the pool. Try to be aware of and use colors that will mix with each other to create new colors.

Step 3.
Place multiple golf balls in the pool.

Step 4.
Have the children line up around the pool and grab the side. Encourage them to work together to get the golf balls to run into the paint and over the paper.

Step 5.
When finished, display your beautiful masterpieces and use a hose to rinse the pool!

Furthermore:
Do this activity several days in a row to see how the children’s improves given more practice. Ask them what they’ve learned about mixing colors. What are some of their favorite colors to make?

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Inkblot Art

inkblotart

Submitted by: Jenny Buck

Inspired by the Rorschach inkblot test, students will create their own inkblot artwork and use their creativity to decide what it is.

Goal:

  • To teach the concept of mirror images

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: Construction paper, paint and possible embellishments such as wiggly eyes.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Fold a piece of construction paper in half. This can be either horizontally or vertically.

Step 2.
On one half of the paper, place dots of paint in a random pattern. Try using some small dots of paint and some larger dots of paint. Don’t make the dots too large to avoid paint escaping from the paper.

Step 3.
Now, with the paper on a table or other solid surface, carefully fold the blank side on top of the painted side. Press gently so that the paint spreads on both sides of the paper.

Step 4.
Open the paper to discover the inkblot artwork! Provide the children with embellishments to use to decorate their art once they decide what it is.

Step 5.
To allow creativity in finding a defined object within something seemingly abstract.

Furthermore:
When everyone’s art is complete, display them for the entire class to see. Encourage discussion amongst the students. Does everyone see the same thing that the artist saw? Do they see something different?

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