Tag Archives: biocolor

Valentine’s Day Monster

valentinemonster

Create a friendly “monster” to share on Valentine’s Day!

Goals:

  • To create a special gift to give on Valentine’s Day
  • To practice creativity

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: cardboard craft rolls, assorted pipe cleaners, assorted craft twist ties, ceramic or foam heart shapes, wiggly eyes, pom poms, red and pink paint, paint brushes and tacky glue.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Paint a craft roll in a Valentine’s Day color. Alternatively, you could cover the roll in construction paper or foil paper.

Step 2.
Glue two lengths of either craft twist ties or pipe cleaners in the center of the craft roll. These will be the monster’s legs.

Step 3.
Glue a heart shape to the end of each leg. You can use ceramic or foam heart shapes, or simply cut your own hearts out of construction paper. Paint, if desired.

Step 4.
Glue two wiggly eyes and a pom pom nose to the outside front of the monster.

Step 5.
Twist the ends of two pipe cleaners together to create an extra-long pipe cleaner. Wrap the extra-long pipe cleaner through the back side of the monster and create a heart-shaped antenna.

Step 6.
Display your monster, or give to someone special!

Furthermore:
Stuff the monster with a small baggie of Valentine’s Day treats to give someone an extra-special delivery!

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Tape Art

tapeart

Submitted by: Alison Busby

Toddlers use tape to create amazing effects in their art.

Goals:

  • To explore cause and effect
  • To practice fine motor skills
  • To participate in a hands-on sensory activity

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: paint in multiple colors, masking or painter’s tape, cardstock or heavy painting paper, paint brushes.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Apply tape to the paper in the desired design.

Step 2.
Use fingers or painting tools to paint over the tape.

Step 3.
Carefully remove the tape from the paper.

Furthermore:
Try adding additional layers of colors. After painting with one color and removing the tape, put down more tape and paint a second color. What happens in the areas where the paint colors overlap?

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Circle Prints

circleprints

Submitted by: Maria Langis

Children use cups to make circle prints on paper.

Goals:

  • To explore various painting techniques
  • To identify the shape “circle”
  • To practice hand-eye coordination
  • To use fine motor skills

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: plastic or paper cups, various colors of paint, white finger paint paper, construction paper, scissors and glue sticks.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Fill the bottom of trays or plates with a single color of paint (make several colors available). Provide plastic or paper cups to the children. If possible, provide cups of different sizes.

Step 2.
Have the children take their cup and dip the open end into a color of paint. Then, have them press their cup onto their finger paint paper. Repeat using different colors and placing each circle in a slightly different location to create unique patterns.

Step 3.
When the painting is dry, cut around the perimeter of the painting (help the children as necessary).

Step 4.
Using glue sticks, mount the finished painting onto a contrasting color of construction paper.

Furthermore:
Discuss circle shapes with the children. What attributes do all circles have in common? What are some everyday items that are shaped like circles?

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Footprint Ghosts

footprintghosts

Submitted by: Laurie Shaw

Children use their feet to make ghost decorations for Halloween.

Goals:

  • To promote creative thinking
  • To encourage organizational and planning skills

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: white paint, construction paper, a small paint roller, glitter glue, wiggly eyes and other decorative items.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Lay out plastic or newspaper to protect the floor.

Step 2.
Using a paint roller, gently roll white paint onto the bottom of the children’s feet.

Step 3.
Have the children carefully stand on a piece of construction paper, placed on a hard surface.

Step 4.
Decorate the ghosts using wiggly eyes, glitter glue or any other decorative items.

Furthermore:
Have the children compare and discuss the different shapes and sizes of each other’s footprints.

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Painting with Jackson Pollock

pollock

Submitted by: Christie Castagno

After introducing children to artist Jackson Pollock, they create their own Jackson-Pollock-style abstract painting.

Goals:

  • To learn some simple information about artist Jackson Pollock and how he painted pictures
  • To become familiar with the terms “abstract painting” and “motion painting”
  • To experience painting by moving
  • To introduce the concept that different artists have different “styles”

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: BioColor® paint in many different colors, canvas panels, paint brushes, paint cups and smocks.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Give the children a simple lesson about Jackson Pollock and how he painted. Explain the difference between abstract art and realistic art, and that there are many different ways to paint (see website under “Furthermore” for more information).

Step 2.
Provide each child with a canvas panel. Have them choose a single solid color and paint the entire panel that color. (Or, use color canvas panels) Allow to dry overnight.

Step 3.
Take the children outside and set up all painting materials in an area when they can get a little messy. Provide smocks, if possible.

Step 4.
Have the children throw, splatter and drip paint on their canvases. Their goal should be to paint without touching the paintbrush to the canvas. Paint your own canvas as an example for the children – and to get in on the fun!

Furthermore:
Visit jacksonpollock.org to experiment with making digital Jackson Pollock art. Remind children about the difference between abstract art and realistic art.

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Painting With Nature

paintingnature

Submitted by: Carrie Dunn

Find and use interesting natural items to paint a picture!

Goals:

  • To explore different textures within nature
  • To explore color mixing
  • To practice using descriptor words
  • To practice using fine motor skills

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: BioColor® paint, art paper, paper plates or paint trays and various items collected from nature.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Lead a nature walk outside to gather items to use to paint with. Provide the children with a small bag to use to collect their items. Some items could be assorted leaves, flowers or small twigs and branches.

Step 2.
Pour various colors of BioColor® paint onto paper plates or plastic art trays.

Step 3.
Dip a nature item into the paint, then carefully use the nature item to paint onto the art paper.

Step 4.
Add or mix additional colors onto the picture. Use multiple nature items to create different effects.

Furthermore:
Discuss the different effects that various nature items have when they are used to paint on art paper. Does it make a difference if the item is soft, hard, rough or smooth?

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Iceberg Melt

icebergmelt

Submitted by: Kate Parker

Using icebergs made from paint, children watch the melting process and make observations of the combination of colors, flow of the melting colors and the elapsed time needed for their “icebergs” to melt.

Goals:

  • To practice measuring
  • To understand the difference between liquids and solids
  • To hypothesize about the new colors created when colors are mixed
  • To create art and patterns from the melting “iceberg” paint
  • To discuss where real icebergs can be found

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: small paper cups, markers, water, BioColor® paint colors and a covered working surface.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Give each student a small paper cup and have them write their name on it. Students should add their own mix of BioColor® paint to their cup. Freeze overnight.

Step 2.
Have the children guess (i.e., make hypotheses) what will happen when their icebergs begin to melt and blend together. What new colors will be created?

Step 3.
Tear away the paper cups to release each iceberg. Place the icebergs on a plastic tray, panel or another type of water container.

Step 4.
Observe the melting icebergs. Which hypotheses proved to be true? Encourage the children to develop new hypotheses as they observe.

Furthermore:
Discuss further scientific principles that can be observed while the icebergs are melting. For example, solid water (ice) floats on liquid water. Do the melting paint colors blend the same way they do on paper?

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