Tag Archives: curriculum

Kandinsky Circles

kadinsky

Submitted by: Heather Lockwood

Create an array of color paper rolled to mimic Kandinsky’s circles.

Goals:

  • To practice fine motor skills
  • To explore different color combinations
  • To work as a group to make a piece of cooperative art

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: cardboard box lids (e.g., shoe box or paper box lids); an array of different types of paper in different colors, sizes and patterns; black paint; paint brushes; scissors and glue.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Either before beginning the activity with the children, or as a class, paint the inside of the box lids black.

Step 2.
Cut the paper into strips of different widths and lengths.

Step 3.
Using a paint brush, coat the inside of the box lid(s) with a paint brush.

Step 4.
Have the children roll up the sheets of paper like a scroll. Place the rolled up paper standing up inside the box lid(s).

Step 5.
Fill the entire inside of the box lid(s) with rolled up paper.

Step 6.
Allow the glue to dry, then display on a wall.

Furthermore:
Wassily Kandinsky was a Russian artist who was famous for his abstract works that made use of circle shapes. Research Kandinsky in the library or online to spark discussion on abstract art. The Kandinsky Circle activity does not involve painting, but the same ideas behind it could be applied to a painting activity. Provide the children with paper and paint and encourage them to create an abstract painting using circles and/or other shapes.

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Glittery Salt

glittersalt

Create bright, three-dimensional collages or fill glass jars with layers of sparkling color! Turn flat surfaces into imaginative, tactile, sparkly works of art, with salt as your main ingredient! Add rich, vibrant color, and great texture to any collage.

Goals:

  • To observe cause and effect
  • To have fun with a sensory art activity
  • To develop fine motor skills

Before You Start:
Gather sand art bottles or recycle, small clean empty glass jars or bottles with lids from home. Set out funnels, rock salt or table salt, Liquid Watercolor™ paints, a 1/4 measuring cup, a tablespoon, BioColor® Shimmer Powder and paper towels.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Add 1 Tbsp. of Colorations® Liquid Watercolor to ¼ cup of regular table salt or rock salt, and mix.

Step 2.
Spread mixture out on a paper towel and microwave on high for 2 minutes.

Step 3.
Using fingers break up the dried pieces until the consistency is granular again.

Step 4.
Try adding baby oil or Metallic Powder for a shimmering effect. Adds rich, vibrant color, and great texture to any collage. (Does not work with gold, silver or white.)

Furthermore:
Salt teaches children about science. It’s very absorbent and reduces the freezing point of water. That’s why rock salt is sprinkled onto roads after a snowstorm: it lowers the freezing point of water and makes driving safer. It’s also used to make homemade ice cream. Think about it!

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Tape Art

tapeart

Submitted by: Alison Busby

Toddlers use tape to create amazing effects in their art.

Goals:

  • To explore cause and effect
  • To practice fine motor skills
  • To participate in a hands-on sensory activity

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: paint in multiple colors, masking or painter’s tape, cardstock or heavy painting paper, paint brushes.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Apply tape to the paper in the desired design.

Step 2.
Use fingers or painting tools to paint over the tape.

Step 3.
Carefully remove the tape from the paper.

Furthermore:
Try adding additional layers of colors. After painting with one color and removing the tape, put down more tape and paint a second color. What happens in the areas where the paint colors overlap?

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3-D Pyramid Ornament

3-D Pyramid Ornament

Submitted by: Rhonda Pena

Create a decorative holiday ornament while reinforcing knowledge of geometric properties.

Goals:

  • Create a decorative holiday ornament
  • Identify the geometric properties of a 3-D square pyramid, including faces, edges and vertices

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: Foam or tag board to cut the pyramid shapes from, pipe cleaners, pom-poms, ribbon, glue and tape.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Cut out a square and 4 identical triangles from the foam or tag board. The triangles should have a side that is the same length as the sides of the square. More-advanced students can try to create a “net” from a single piece of foam or tag board that will simply fold together to form the square pyramid.

Step 2.
Use glue or tape to put together the square pyramid. Hot glue may work best for this step, but be sure to do so carefully with adult supervision.

Step 3.
Decorate the ornaments using pipe cleaners along the edges, pom-poms at the vertices (corners) or anything else you like.

Step 4.
Attach a loop of ribbon and hang!

Furthermore:
As you are making your ornaments, discuss with the students the different attributes of a pyramid. Encourage them to discuss the attributes with their families after taking their ornament home.

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Star Tree

startree

Submitted by: Tracy Emond

This is a great math activity to celebrate the Christmas/holiday season.

Goals:

  • To help children practice fractions and measurement
  • To create a beautiful centerpiece to display for the holiday season

Before You Start:
Gather all the necessary supplies, including: green and yellow construction paper, rulers, tape, glue, scissors, glitter, sequins, beads, pom-poms and other decorating items.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Have children measure 1″ increments lengthwise (and draw lines) on 2-3 sheets of green construction paper. Have them cut along the lines, creating 1″ wide strips.

Step 2.
Have children measure and cut the 1″ strips into the following seven lengths: 20″, 17-1/2″, 15″, 12-1/2″, 10″, 7-1/2″ and 5″. (For longer lengths, you may need to tape 2 strips together at the ends before measuring.)

Step 3.
Demonstrate how to fan-fold (like an accordion) the 20″ strip in 2″ wide sections. Have the children fan-fold the rest of the strips in varying increments. Fold 17-1/2″ strip into 1-3/4″ increments, 15″ into 1-1/2″ increments, 12-1/2″ strip into 1-1/4″ increments, 10″ strip folded into 1″ increments, 7-1/2″ strip folded into 3/4″ increments and 5″ strip folded into 1/2″ increments.

Step 4.
Let children decorate their strips on one side with the glitter, beads and other items and let dry.

Step 5.
Have them refold each strip and tape the ends together. This will create beautiful star shapes.

Step 6.
Starting with the largest star, stack them on top of one another, turning each one just slightly so they will balance on the one below.

Step 7.
Now you have a decorated Christmas tree to display in the classroom and/or use as a centerpiece for the holiday season!

Furthermore:
You can top off your tree by creating a star out of yellow construction paper or by using a large, yellow pom-pom. This is an easy project to take apart and reassemble over and over for years to come.

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Gobble Gobble Jar of Thanks

jarthanks

Submitted by: Audrey Meidl

A great way to give thanks and to share what young ones are thankful for.

Goals:

  • To reinforce social/emotional development
  • To encourage creativity

Before You Start:
Have on hand craft foam, felt or construction paper in brown, red, yellow and orange. You will also need a papier-mâché flower pot or glass jar, scissors, tacky glue and wiggly eyes. You will also need sentence strips (or strips of cut-up lined paper) and pencils.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Using felt, foam or paper, cut out two ovals of the same size. Glue the two ovals to the outside of the flower pot or jar. This will be the turkey head. Allow the young ones to be creative with this; there is no “right” or “wrong” way.

Step 2.
Using felt, foam or paper in fall colors such as red, yellow, orange, etc., cut out more oval shapes (one of each color) and glue them to the opposite end of the flower pot or jar, on the outside.

Step 3.
Glue on wiggly eyes and use leftover felt, foam or paper to create the waddle and beak.

Step 4.
After the children are finished creating their turkey pots, have them write down things they are thankful for on the strips of paper and place them into the pot.

Step 5.
During circle time, have each child take turns sharing what they are thankful for.

Furthermore:
Tip: you can also use craft feathers instead of felt or foam for added texture. Also, add more details such as feet, or, you might want to paint the pot or jar to give it more color.

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Circle Prints

circleprints

Submitted by: Maria Langis

Children use cups to make circle prints on paper.

Goals:

  • To explore various painting techniques
  • To identify the shape “circle”
  • To practice hand-eye coordination
  • To use fine motor skills

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: plastic or paper cups, various colors of paint, white finger paint paper, construction paper, scissors and glue sticks.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Fill the bottom of trays or plates with a single color of paint (make several colors available). Provide plastic or paper cups to the children. If possible, provide cups of different sizes.

Step 2.
Have the children take their cup and dip the open end into a color of paint. Then, have them press their cup onto their finger paint paper. Repeat using different colors and placing each circle in a slightly different location to create unique patterns.

Step 3.
When the painting is dry, cut around the perimeter of the painting (help the children as necessary).

Step 4.
Using glue sticks, mount the finished painting onto a contrasting color of construction paper.

Furthermore:
Discuss circle shapes with the children. What attributes do all circles have in common? What are some everyday items that are shaped like circles?

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