Tag Archives: eggs

Colorations® Tissue Easter Egg

tissueegg

These colorful eggs are an easy Spring activity to include in any arts and crafts curriculum!

Goals:

  • To promote tactile exploration
  • To help develop fine motor skills while encouraging creativity
  • To have fun making a simple craft and Spring or Easter holiday decoration

Before You Start:
Gather Colorations® Heavyweight Construction Paper in a variety of pastel and springtime colors and cut into large egg shapes. Prepare small pieces of Colorations® Premium Art Tissue and small paint cups or bowl of Colorations® Washable School Glue. Set out a variety of Colorations® markers, crayons and colored pencils.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Give each child one or more egg shapes you’ve cut out of construction paper, or consider allowing the children to cut out their own “egg” shape.

Step 2.
Demonstrate to children how to wad a tissue paper square and dip into glue, and stick on their eggs.

Step 3.
Encourage the children to use different colors of tissue to decorate their eggs any way they like.

Step 4.
Have them experiment drawing on the eggs with the crayons and markers to finish their unique decorations. Eggs can be displayed in the classroom for the Easter holiday or given as a special gift to loved ones.

Furthermore:
These decorations can also easily be made into ornaments that can be displayed by hanging in the classroom or outside on a tree, fence, etc.

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Peek-a-Boo Hatching Chicks

hatchingchicks

Submitted by: Kathryn Fournie

A simple, yet fun craft to celebrate the coming of spring!

Goals:

  • To celebrate spring through creative arts
  • To develop fine motor skills
  • To encourage creativity

Before You Start:
You will need cardstock in an assortment of bright colors, crayons, scissors, metallic markers, Liquid Watercolor™ paint, paint brushes, tape, brads, a hole punch, wiggly eyes and chick cut outs made by the children.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Have the children each draw a chick on yellow construction paper, then help them cut out their chick shapes. (Give them a general guideline by showing them a chick cut out that you have made beforehand, but allow them to be creative with their chick creations.)

Step 2.
Have each child draw a large oval shape on a piece of cardstock (big enough to cover the size of your chick cut outs), then ask them to decorate inside of their ovals with lines, swirls, dots (or with whatever patterns they would like) with markers. Then, paint on top of the colored area.

Step 3.
When the watercolor dries, have the children cut out their oval shapes, then cut the shapes in half across the middle.

Step 4.
Take the two egg pieces and punch a hole in the corner. Then, help the kids insert a brad through the hole (or do this yourself), and tape the chicks to the unpainted side of the egg.

Step 5.
Finally, have each child glue wiggly eyes onto their chicks. Now the egg can open and close, and each chick can hatch out of its shell!

Furthermore:
These make for a great springtime display for your center!

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How is the Earth Like an Egg?

earthegg

Submitted by: Stephanie Cornwell

This is a great hands-on lesson for teaching your students about the layers of the earth and for older students you can even teach about the plates and how they move.

Goal:

  • To identify and label the layers of the earth by using an everyday object as a model.

Before You Start:
Boil an egg for each student or pair. Create a question sheet for students to answer as they complete the activity.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Give each student an egg and a butter knife. Discuss what the egg is and ask students if they have any ideas about how the egg is like the earth before they start.

Step 2.
Have each student gently tap the shell of the egg and crack it in several places. If you have studied the earth’s crust your students should be able to tell you that this is like the crust of the earth and that a cracked shell is a better model of the earth than a smooth shell because the cracks are like the plates.

Step 3.
Next, have students cut straight through the shell cutting the egg in half.

Step 4.
Ask the students to talk about what they see. What part of the earth is the white part like? What part is the yolk like?

Step 5.
In the end I had my students finish answering these questions on the paper I gave them. Finally, they got to eat their egg.

Furthermore:
For older, more advanced students you could finish the crust activities by moving and pushing the “plates” and talking about how fault-block, dome-shaped, and other types of mountains are formed.

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