Tag Archives: pom-poms

Clothespin Caterpillars

clothespincaterpillarsCreate cute clothespin caterpillars that can be used to hang art work or be given as gifts.

Goals:

  • To practice fine motor skills
  • To explore different color combinations
  • To express creativity

Before You Start:
Gather materials needed: clothespins, tacky glue, pom-poms and wiggly eyes.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Set out all materials and provide children with 1 or 2 clothespins each.

Step 2.
Apply a line of tacky glue along the entire length of one side of a clothespin.

Step 3.
Place a row of pom-poms close together on the glue. Use however many can fit on the clothespin (3-5 is usually a good number).

Step 4.
Apply two dots of tacky glue to the pom-pom on the opening side of the clothespin. Apply wiggly eyes to the glue.

Step 5.
Allow the glue to dry, then place wherever you like!

Furthermore:
Use the Clothespin Caterpillars activity to supplement learning about real caterpillars, or for when reading about The Hungry Caterpillar. Or, use brown pom-poms to make clothespin worms. Then read the book Diary of a Worm by Doreen Cronin.

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Colorful Pom Pom Bottles

pompombottles

Submitted by: Alicia Colebeck

Introduce colorful pom pom bottles to your play areas for an easy and fun lesson about color recognition!

Goals:

  • To reinforce color recognition
  • To develop fine motor skills
  • To develop early cooperative play skills

Before You Start:

Gather empty clear containers of various sizes, and various pom poms in different colors and sizes. Be sure to include a good number of large pom poms.

Let’s Get Started!
Step 1.
Fill the clear containers completely with pom poms. Try to vary the colors of the pom poms; you may even want to work with creating layers of color. The idea is to have the colors that are being taught visible from the exterior of the bottle for identifying and talking about. When the containers are filled, be sure to screw the caps on.

Step 2.
After you have the bottles set up, get everyone in a group. Point to specific colors and ask them to identify each color.

Furthermore:
Leave the bottles in areas where infants and toddlers play, so that when you’re not engaging in the activity together, they can explore the bottles on their own.

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